Eviction for Non-payment of Rent or Utilities

How can I evict my tenant for failure to pay rent?

BC Landlord Guide- Eviction for Non-payment of Rent or Utilities
How can I evict my tenant for failure to pay rent?

If a tenant fails to pay rent on the day that it is due, then any day after that day, the landlord may issue a Ten-day Notice to End Tenancy. Within 5 days of receiving the landlord’s notice, the tenant may either pay the overdue rent or make an Application for Dispute Resolution by Direct Request. If the tenant fails to take any action within 5 days, the tenant is presumed to have accepted that the tenancy ends on the effective day of the landlord’s notice and must vacate the rental unit by that date.

If a tenant fails to pay utility charges on the day that they are due, the landlord may issue a written demand to the tenant that they be paid. If despite this demand they remain unpaid for more than 30 days, the landlord may treat the unpaid utility charges as unpaid rent and may serve the tenant with a 10-day Notice to End Tenancy. Once this notice is issued, the same 5-day rule applies as with unpaid rent.

Last revised: January 4, 2017

  • Tenants will often make the mistake of attempting to withhold rent for the purposes of coercing you to do something (ex. repair the rental unit). However, the Residential Tenancy Act only allows the tenant to deduct money from the rent owing under very specific circumstances. Unless (1) the tenant has an arbitrator’s decision allowing a deduction, (2) you have illegally increased the rent, (3) you have overcharged for a security or pet damage deposit, (4) you have refused the tenant’s written request for reimbursement of emergency repairs or (5) you have provided written permission to the tenant to deduct rent, the tenant is otherwise not allowed to deduct any portion of the rent payable.