Ending a Tenancy by Mutual Agreement

How can my tenant and I agree to end the tenancy?

BC Landlord Guide- Ending a Tenancy by Mutual Agreement
How can my tenant and I agree to end the tenancy?

In an attempt to resolve issues, the landlord and the tenant are always at liberty to mutually agree to put an end to the tenancy and, if necessary to reach an agreement, arrange for one party to monetarily compensate the other in exchange for their consent to end the tenancy. Such settlements agreements are often more practical, quicker and less expensive than a hearing before the Residential Tenancy Branch.

Last revised: April 17, 2016

  • Landlords will often delay seeking legal counsel until after a dispute resolution hearing has been scheduled. While not all disputes will require legal counsel, as a general rule, the longer you wait to consult a lawyer, the more expensive it becomes to resolve a dispute. This is particularly true when a decision has already been rendered by the Residential Tenancy Branch and you are seeking to have it set aside. At the early stages of a dispute, a lawyer will often be able to intervene to diffuse tension and negotiate a fair resolution before the parties even see the need to resort to a dispute resolution hearing. You may find that this will save you time, money and energy.

This article explains in a general way the law that applies in British Columbia, Canada and is not a substitute for legal advice specific to your situation.